Books

New Book: Spanish Presence in Sixteenth-Century Iberia

The Spanish Presence in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Images of Iberia, Piers Baker-Bates and Miles Pattenden, eds (Ashgate, 2015).

Introduction, Simon Ditchfield.

Part I The Spanish Presence in Italian Politics, Society and Culture:

Mere emulators of Italy: the Spanish in Italian diplomatic discourse, 1492-1550, Catherine Fletcher;

Hispanophobia in the Venetian Republic, Nicholas Davidson;

Encountering Spain in early modern Naples: language, customs and sociability, Stephen Cummins.

Part II Spanish Religiosity and Roman Religion:

Rome as a ‘Spanish Avignon’? The Spanish faction and the monarchy of Philip II, Miles Pattenden;

Rome and the ‘Spanish theology’: Spanish monarchy, doctrinal controversies and the defence of papal prerogatives from Clement VIII to Urban VIII, Paolo Broggio;

Spanish saints in Counter-Reformation Italy, Clare Copeland.

Part III Spanish Vision and the Visual Arts in Italy: ‘Graecia capta ferum victorem coepit’: Spanish patrons and Italian artists, Piers Baker-Bates;

The stranded tomb: cultural allusions in the funeral monument of Don Pedro de Toledo, San Giacomo degli Spagnoli, Naples, Robert W. Gaston and Andrea M. Gáldy;

Inventive translation, portraiture and Spanish Habsburg taste in the 16th century, Elena Calvillo;

The politics of art or the art of politics? The Marquis del Carpio in Rome and Naples (1677-1687), Jorge Fernández-Santos Ortiz-Iribas.

About emspanishhistorynotes

Scott Taylor is an associate professor in the history department at the University of Kentucky.

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: