Conferences/colloquia/seminars/lectures

Empire and Exceptionalism: The Requerimiento at Five-Hundred; UCLA Conference, March 6-7, 2015

Empire and Exceptionalism: TheRequerimiento at Five-Hundred
A conference at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
—organized by Andrew Devereux (Loyola Marymount University) and Anthony Pagden (University of California, Los Angeles)
Friday, March 6 & Saturday, March 7, 2015 The conference addresses the justifications for conquest and empire in the early modern Spanish world by examining them against the broader panorama of European colonial ventures in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and beyond. Using the Spanish Requerimientoas a point of departure, “Empire and Exceptionalism” explores a comparative approach to the foundation of empires in the Old World and the New. To justify and rationalize their expansion, medieval and early modern powers often drew on shared legal and historical traditions. Their claims, while obviously oppositional, were in constant dialogue with one another. For instance, recent work has suggested that theRequerimiento was based on traditions of medieval Islamic jurisprudence that addressed the treatment of conquered peoples. How would such traditions have intersected with canon law, humanist traditions, and other justifications for empire? How disparate, ultimately, were the different imperial projects, and how significant were the distinctions? “Empire and Exceptionalism” thus engages some of the most pressing historical questions concerning the origins of European colonialism by examining Mediterranean and Atlantic processes in conjunction with one another and by addressing the degree to which the practices engaged in by the early modern Spanish Empire were exceptional.

Speakers:
Adam G. Beaver, Princeton University
Andrew Devereux, Loyola Marymount University
Claire Gilbert, Saint Louis University
William S. Goldman, University of San Francisco
Camilo Gómez-Rivas, University of California, Santa Cruz
Seth Kimmel, Columbia University
Andrew Laird, University of Warwick
Anthony Pagden, University of California, Los Angeles
István Szászdi, Universidad de Valladolid
Emily Weissbourd, University of Pennsylvania


–Online Registration Form
Registration Deadline: March 3, 2015

Please click here for our online registration form.

Registration fees:
All students (with ID), Center & Clark Affiliated Faculty, UC faculty and staff: no charge
General public and other faculty: $20.

*Students should be prepared to provide their current University ID at the conference.

Complimentary lunch and other refreshments are provided to all registrants.

Please be aware that space at the Clark is limited and that registration closes when capacity is reached. Confirmation will be sent via email.

Friday,
March 6
9:30 a.m. Morning Coffee and Registration
10:00 a.m. Barbara Fuchs, University of California, Los Angeles
Welcome

Andrew Devereux, Loyola Marymount University
Anthony Pagden, University of California, Los Angeles

10:15 a.m. Session 1: The Legacy of Islamic Iberia
Chair: Heather Ferguson, Claremont McKenna College

Camilo Gómez-Rivas, University of California, Santa Cruz
Accommodation and Displacement in Times of Conquest: Subject-hood, Identity, Reciprocity

István Szászdi, Universidad de Valladolid
The Requerimiento: 500 Years in the Development of an Hispanic Institution (11th16th Centuries)

Claire Gilbert, Saint Louis University
The Contracts of Conquest: Treaties of Conversion inMudéjar and Morisco Granada

Q & A

12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m. Session 2: Children of Abraham and Iberian Empire
Chair: Daniela Bleichmar, University of Southern California

Andrew Devereux, Loyola Marymount University
A Mediterranean Counterpart to the Requerimiento?:Juan López de Palacios Rubios’ Justification for Spanish Conquests in Africa and the Holy Land

Seth Kimmel, Columbia University
Fashioning Precedent: The Imperial Politics of New Christian Assimilation

Q & A

3:00 p.m. Coffee Break
3:15 p.m. Session 3: Spanish Monarchs, the Papacy, and a New World Order
Chair: Kevin Terraciano, University of California, Los Angeles

Adam G. Beaver, Princeton University
Was the Reconquista a Precedent for Empire? Atlantic Conquest in Light of Spain’s Mediterranean Diplomacy

Anthony Pagden, University of California, Los Angeles
The Requerimiento, the Bulls of Donation, the Treaty of Tordesillas and the Law of Nations, 15121812

Q & A

4:45 p.m. Reception
Saturday,
March 7
9:30 a.m. Morning Coffee and Registration
10:00 a.m. Session 4: Spain and its Imperial Rivals in the Early Modern Atlantic
Chair: Rachel Sarah O’Toole, University of California, Irvine

Andrew Laird, University of Warwick
Constructing Native Responses to the Requerimiento in Sixteenth-Century New Spain

William S. Goldman, University of San Francisco
“Islands of the Ocean Sea:” The Requerimiento and European Expansion in the New World

Emily Weissbourd, University of Pennsylvania
Echoes of the Requerimiento in English Imperial Ventures

Q & A

12:15 p.m. Roundtable Discussion
12:45 p.m. Program concludes

http://www.c1718cs.ucla.edu/content/progs/empire14.htm

QUICK LINKS:

Calendar of Events

 

About emspanishhistorynotes

Scott Taylor is an associate professor in the history department at the University of Kentucky.

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