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Parrott Reviews Parker, “Global Crisis,” in LRB, March 5, 2015

David Parrott, “Sad Century,” London Review of Books 37/5 (March 5, 2015).

Empire and Exceptionalism: The Requerimiento at Five-Hundred; UCLA Conference, March 6-7, 2015

Empire and Exceptionalism: TheRequerimiento at Five-Hundred
A conference at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
—organized by Andrew Devereux (Loyola Marymount University) and Anthony Pagden (University of California, Los Angeles)
Friday, March 6 & Saturday, March 7, 2015 The conference addresses the justifications for conquest and empire in the early modern Spanish world by examining them against the broader panorama of European colonial ventures in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and beyond. Using the Spanish Requerimientoas a point of departure, “Empire and Exceptionalism” explores a comparative approach to the foundation of empires in the Old World and the New. To justify and rationalize their expansion, medieval and early modern powers often drew on shared legal and historical traditions. Their claims, while obviously oppositional, were in constant dialogue with one another. For instance, recent work has suggested that theRequerimiento was based on traditions of medieval Islamic jurisprudence that addressed the treatment of conquered peoples. How would such traditions have intersected with canon law, humanist traditions, and other justifications for empire? How disparate, ultimately, were the different imperial projects, and how significant were the distinctions? “Empire and Exceptionalism” thus engages some of the most pressing historical questions concerning the origins of European colonialism by examining Mediterranean and Atlantic processes in conjunction with one another and by addressing the degree to which the practices engaged in by the early modern Spanish Empire were exceptional.

Speakers:
Adam G. Beaver, Princeton University
Andrew Devereux, Loyola Marymount University
Claire Gilbert, Saint Louis University
William S. Goldman, University of San Francisco
Camilo Gómez-Rivas, University of California, Santa Cruz
Seth Kimmel, Columbia University
Andrew Laird, University of Warwick
Anthony Pagden, University of California, Los Angeles
István Szászdi, Universidad de Valladolid
Emily Weissbourd, University of Pennsylvania


–Online Registration Form
Registration Deadline: March 3, 2015

Please click here for our online registration form.

Registration fees:
All students (with ID), Center & Clark Affiliated Faculty, UC faculty and staff: no charge
General public and other faculty: $20.

*Students should be prepared to provide their current University ID at the conference.

Complimentary lunch and other refreshments are provided to all registrants.

Please be aware that space at the Clark is limited and that registration closes when capacity is reached. Confirmation will be sent via email.

Friday,
March 6
9:30 a.m. Morning Coffee and Registration
10:00 a.m. Barbara Fuchs, University of California, Los Angeles
Welcome

Andrew Devereux, Loyola Marymount University
Anthony Pagden, University of California, Los Angeles

10:15 a.m. Session 1: The Legacy of Islamic Iberia
Chair: Heather Ferguson, Claremont McKenna College

Camilo Gómez-Rivas, University of California, Santa Cruz
Accommodation and Displacement in Times of Conquest: Subject-hood, Identity, Reciprocity

István Szászdi, Universidad de Valladolid
The Requerimiento: 500 Years in the Development of an Hispanic Institution (11th16th Centuries)

Claire Gilbert, Saint Louis University
The Contracts of Conquest: Treaties of Conversion inMudéjar and Morisco Granada

Q & A

12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m. Session 2: Children of Abraham and Iberian Empire
Chair: Daniela Bleichmar, University of Southern California

Andrew Devereux, Loyola Marymount University
A Mediterranean Counterpart to the Requerimiento?:Juan López de Palacios Rubios’ Justification for Spanish Conquests in Africa and the Holy Land

Seth Kimmel, Columbia University
Fashioning Precedent: The Imperial Politics of New Christian Assimilation

Q & A

3:00 p.m. Coffee Break
3:15 p.m. Session 3: Spanish Monarchs, the Papacy, and a New World Order
Chair: Kevin Terraciano, University of California, Los Angeles

Adam G. Beaver, Princeton University
Was the Reconquista a Precedent for Empire? Atlantic Conquest in Light of Spain’s Mediterranean Diplomacy

Anthony Pagden, University of California, Los Angeles
The Requerimiento, the Bulls of Donation, the Treaty of Tordesillas and the Law of Nations, 15121812

Q & A

4:45 p.m. Reception
Saturday,
March 7
9:30 a.m. Morning Coffee and Registration
10:00 a.m. Session 4: Spain and its Imperial Rivals in the Early Modern Atlantic
Chair: Rachel Sarah O’Toole, University of California, Irvine

Andrew Laird, University of Warwick
Constructing Native Responses to the Requerimiento in Sixteenth-Century New Spain

William S. Goldman, University of San Francisco
“Islands of the Ocean Sea:” The Requerimiento and European Expansion in the New World

Emily Weissbourd, University of Pennsylvania
Echoes of the Requerimiento in English Imperial Ventures

Q & A

12:15 p.m. Roundtable Discussion
12:45 p.m. Program concludes

http://www.c1718cs.ucla.edu/content/progs/empire14.htm

QUICK LINKS:

Calendar of Events

 

Special Volume of JIH: “Art & Trade in the Age of Global Encounters, 1492-1800”

The Journal of Interdisciplinary History 45/3 (2014) was a special issue devoted to “Art and Trade in the Age of Global Encounters, 1492-1600,” ed. Mari-Tere Álvarez and Charlene Villaseñor-Black. Also a review.

Mari-Tere Álvarez and Charlene Villaseñor-Black, “Introduction.”

Paula de Vos, “Apothecaries, Artists, and Artisans: Early Industrial Material Culture in the Biological Old Regime.”

Barbara C. Anderson, “Evidence of Cocineal’s Use in Painting.”

Rocío Bruquetas, “The Search for the Perfect Color: Pigments, Tints, and Binders in the Scientific Expeditions to the Americas.”

Gabriela A. Siracusano, “Mary’s Green Brilliance: The Case of the Virgin of Copacabana.”

Theodore K. Rabb reviews Daniel Strum, The Sugar Trade: Brazil, Portugal, and the Netherlands (1595-1630) (Stanford, 2013).

Hontanilla, “Sentiment and the Law” in ECS

Ana Hontanilla, “Sentiment and the Law: Inventing the Category of the Wretched Slave in the Real Audiencia of Santo Domingo,” Eighteenth Century Studies 48/2 (2015): 181-200.

CFP: SCSC, Vancouver CA, Oct 22-25, 2015

Vancouver 2015 Conference Call for Papers.

The Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC) is now accepting proposals for individual presentation proposals and complete panels for its 2015 annual conference, to be held 22-25 October 2015 at the Sheraton Wall Centre Hotel in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  The deadline for proposals is April 15, 2015. Within four weeks after the deadline, the Program Committee will notify all those who submitted proposals.

New Book: “The Monk’s Haggadah”

The Monk’s Haggadah: A Fifteenth-Century Illuminated Codex from the Monastery of Tegernsee, with a prologue by Friar Erhard von Pappenheim, ed. David Stern,  Christoph Markschies, and Sarit Shalev-Eyni (Penn State University Press, 2015).

New Book: “Spanish Enlightenment Revisited”

Jesús Astigarraga, ed., The Spanish Enlightenment Revisited (Voltaire Foundation, 2015).

Jesús Astigarraga, “Introduction: admirer, rougir, imiter – Spain and the European Enlightenment.”

María Victoria López-Cordón Cortezo, “The merits of good gobierno: culture and politics in the Bourbon court.”

Joaquín Álvarez Barrientos, “The Spanish Republic of Letters in its European context: images, economics, and the representation of the man of letters.”

Jesús Astigarraga, “Economic societies and the politicisation of the Spanish Enlightenment.”

Juan Pimentel, “The Indians of Europe: the role of Spain’s Enlightenment in the making of a global science.”

Javier Usoz, “Political economy and the creation of the public sphere during the Spanish Enlightenment.”

Ignacio Fernández Sarasola, “Constitution projects during the Spanish Enlightenment.”

Gabriel Paquette, “The reform of the Spanish empire in the age of Enlightenment.”

Jesús Astigarraga, Niccolò Guasti and Juan Zabalza, “The Spanish debate on public finance: a privileged laboratory for enlightened reforms.”

Joaquín Varela Suanzes-Carpegna, “The image of the British system of government in Spain (1759-1814).”

Javier Fernández Sebastián, “From the ‘voice of the people’ to the freedom of the press: the birth of public opinion.”

Alejandro Agüero and Marta Lorente, “Penal Enlightenment in Spain: from Beccaria’s reception to the first criminal code.”

New Book: Barton, “Conquerors, Brides, and Concubines”

Simon Barton, Conquerors, Brides, and Concubines: Interfaith Relations and Social Power in Medieval Iberia (Penn, 2015).

Madden on President Obama

Pretty hard to believe that Thomas F Madden would publish something like this: “Getting Medieval: Let’s Leave the Middle Ages out of Discussions of Modern Islam.”

Madden is either obtuse, or is being knowingly disingenuous.

It seems pretty clear that:

1) the president was just trying to explain to Americans, most of whom have never met a Muslim and know about them only from what they get from the media, that you can’t judge 1 billion Muslims by the actions, however vile, of a few thousand;

2) that the vast majority of contemporary Christians would admit that the Inquisition and crusades were not true to Jesus’s teachings and were in fact just as much a twisting and distortion of what they think of Christianity as political Islamism is;

3) that many people, for example Jews, would criticize Madden’s portrayal of the crusades and Inquisition (eg, “The work of the Crusader, who put his life at risk and underwent enormous expense, was to save Christian people and restore Christian lands.”) as incomplete at best;

4) his understanding of Christian history (eg, “At some point Christianity as a faith and as a culture had to defend itself or else be subsumed by Islam.”) is wrongheaded – how then did Christianity survive for decades and decades before it gained political power in Roman days?;

and 5) most people who see an article like this, in a magazine like the National Review, won’t even read past the first few sentences and take away, not a somewhat nuanced defense of medieval sensibilities, but rather the simple idea that the President is an idiot, thus confirming their predisposition.

We all fight to defend the past from today’s simplistic assumptions that medieval people were barbaric and ignorant, but that’s not really he’s doing here. It’s Madden who is manipulating the past, not Obama.

CFP: SHARP at the SCSC, Oct 22-25, 2015 Vancouver

Two calls for papers for two guaranteed sessions to be held at the 2015 meeting of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC), October 22-25, in Vancouver, BC. These panels are sponsored by the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP), and the submission deadline for both is March 31, 2015.

Movement of Counter-Reformation Orthodoxy and Ideologies

Proposals are sought for a session examining the movement of Counter-Reformation orthodoxy and ideologies throughout Europe and the Colonial World, to be held at the 2015 meeting of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC), October 22-25, in Vancouver B.C. Possible topics might include the migration of Counter-Reformation spirituality and thought throughout a changing socio-political world, the production, translation, and dissemination of religious texts, policies of censorship and expurgation, and examinations of the diverse cultural and political circumstances that shaped the reception and interpretation of Counter-Reformation orthodoxy and ideology. Papers should relate to the period covered by SCSC, defined roughly as 1450-1660. This session is sponsored by the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP). Proposers need not be members of SHARP to submit, but panelists must be members of both SCSC and SHARP in order to present. Send a 250-word abstract by March 31 to José Espericueta (jespericueta@udallas.edu).

 

Bureaucracy, Knowledge, and the Book in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America

Proposals are sought for a session examining the interrelation of Bureaucracy, Knowledge, and the Book in early modern Spain and Spanish America, to be held at the 2015 meeting of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC), 22-25 October at the Sheraton Wall Centre Hotel in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Papers may consider topics such as, church and crown regulation of the printed book, including preventive and punitive censorship; author and book affiliations to the interlocking crown and church bureaucracies; roles of bureaucratic agents in book production; bureaucratic and political interventions in the production and dissemination of knowledge via the printed book; and circumvention of church and crown bureaucratic mechanisms in book production and dissemination. Papers should relate to the period covered by SCSC, defined roughly as 1450-1660. This session is sponsored by the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP). Proposers need not be members of SHARP to submit, but panelists must be members of both SCSC and SHARP in order to present. Send a 250-word abstract by March 31 to Felipe Ruan (fruan@brocku.ca).