Career news

Michigan Searches for Iberian Atlantic World Chair

Courtesy of H-Net:

The Department of History of the University of Michigan seeks to fill the J. Frederick Hoffman Chair, an endowed chair currently designated for Early Modern History, c. 1400-1750, with strong priority in the Iberian Atlantic. The holder should have international prominence, a record of scholarly achievement, and demonstrated success as teacher and mentor.  Advanced associate professors will be considered as well as senior scholars already at the full professorial rank. We are interested in innovative work on early modern European colonialism that takes the non-European world as part of its primary ground. We especially welcome applications from scholars who study diverse forms of exchange between or among Europe’s and Latin America’s Iberian zones.  Qualified applicants might be working primarily out of one side of the Iberian Atlantic (i.e. either the Iberian Americas or Europe) or they may have a more global or “oceanic” ground of investigation. We are open to innovative scholarship that engages the early modern Iberian Atlantic in any number of possible ways. Please send a letter of interest, c.v., statement of current and future research plans, statement of teaching philosophy and experience, evidence of teaching excellence, a list of available referees, and any other relevant supporting material to Prof. Kathleen Canning, Chair, History Department, 1029 Tisch Hall, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1003; telephone (734) 763-2289; fax (734) 647-4881 or by email to chamlin@umich.edu. Review of applications begins October 25th, 2013, though the search will remain open until the position is filled.  Women and minority scholars are encouraged to apply, and the University is supportive of the needs of dual career couples.  The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

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About emspanishhistorynotes

Scott Taylor is an associate professor in the history department at the University of Kentucky.

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